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Education Week's Photo Blog

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    Josue, 18, is a junior at Erwin High School in Asheville, N.C. An immigrant from El Salvador, Josue faces an uncertain future in the United States—an anxiety he says is heightened by the Trump campaign. —Jacob Biba for Education WeekEducation Week's photo staff presents our favorite images from 2016.

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    Parents, students and administrators wave yellow scarfs as they take part in a rally in support of school choice, Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2017, in Austin , Texas. Past voucher programs seeking to provide public money to families who send their children to private and religious schools have sailed through the state Senate but fizzled in the House, where lawmakers from both parties worry about hurting rural classrooms, but rally organizers are hoping that added political pressure could change that this session. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)This past week there have been approximately 20,000 demonstrations across the country in honor of National School Choice Week. The purpose of the week, according to the National School Choice Week website, is to raise public awareness of choice education options.

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    Connor Maxcy works on a project during the school day on June 9, 2016 in the Isle au Haut school.Connor Maxcy has lived on an island his entire life, where he attended a one-room schoolhouse in Maine. Last June he graduated from the 8th grade and transitioned to inland Maine to attend high school. See images and a video telling his story.

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    Graduating seniors celebrate their achievement Tuesday, June 6, 2017 at Granite Hills High School Commencement Exercises at Rankin Stadium. (Chieko Hara/The Porterville Recorder via AP)The end of the school year marks a time of celebration and the opening of new chapters in students’ lives. Photo editors at Education Week wanted to take a look at images now that the laptops have closed and summer is in full swing.

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    A sign welcoming visitors to the small rural town of Hughes, Arkansas, population 1441. Hughes is about 30 miles outside of Memphis, Tennessee on the other side of the Mississippi River. (Photo By Karen Pulfer Focht for Education Week)Photographer Karen Pulfer Focht and Education Week reporter Denisa Superville recently visited the rural town of Hughes, Ark., where elementary and secondary schools closed at the end of the 2014-15 school year.

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    HIGHLANDS, NJ - April 05, 2017:  

High School students from the Marine Academy of Science & Technology, mostly comprised of freshman in the course area of marine biology, take part in a marine biology lab on a boat owned and managed by the school out in the Sandy Hook Bay. Here, student leaders and upperclassman Austin Colbert, Ryan Elmiger, and James Edwards, and Theo Cheevers help run the ship with along with the captain as a way to assist and mentor their fellow underclassman in the marine biology course by managing the net mechanisms to catch the sea creatures that the students will be studying.

Credit: Mark Abramson for Education WeekPhotographers Mark Abramson, Andrea Morales and Joe Buglewicz worked with Education Week reporter Catherine Gewertz on a three-part series for Education Week that takes a look at the challenges and opportunities faced by three states across the country and their career-and-technical-education programs.

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    Autumn Edwards and her mom Lindsey Edwards walk towards Prairie Mountain School Monday morning so that Autumn can take part in the Kids in Transition to School (KITS) program. KITS gives children entering school the opportunity to go to 24 sessions of school readiness focused on promoting social skills and early literacy.  (Amanda L Smith Photo)Photographer Amanda L. Smith and Education Week reporter Christina A. Samuels take a look at a transition program in Eugene, Ore., that helps prospective kindergartners focus on school readiness, social skills and literacy.

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    Wilmington, Delaware, isn't Chicago or Los Angeles, Baltimore or Detroit. It is a city of less than 72,000 people known primarily as the birthplace of chemical giant DuPont and as a cozy home for big banks and Fortune 500 firms. But an Associated Press and USA TODAY Network analysis of Gun Violence Archive data reveals that Wilmington far and away leads the country in its rate of shootings among young people under 18. Of the 10 cities with the highest rates of teen shootings, most had populations of less than 250,000 people. Among them were Savannah, Ga.; Trenton, N.J.; Syracuse, N.Y., Fort Myers, Fla.; and Richmond, Va. Chicago was the lone large-population city high on the list.

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    U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos cheers with Eastern Hancock students during a high school football game between Eastern Hancock and Knightstown, Friday, Sept. 15, 2017, in Charlottesville, Ind. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)U.S. Secretary of Betsy DeVos' tour to "Rethink Education" by shining a spotlight on promising, outside-the-box educational approaches took her to Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, and Indiana, where she was interviewed by Education Week, and attended a Friday night high school football game.

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    Norberto Collazo maneuvers his horse on a highway near a washed-out bridge in Utuado, Puerto Rico.
--Swikar Patel/Education WeekLess than a month ago, Hurricanes Irma and Maria slammed the island of Puerto Rico, swamping towns and displacing residents from their homes. Schools are still closed to students, but are now used as shelters for displaced families. Education Week photographer Swikar Patel and reporter Andrew Ujifusa recently visited Puerto Rico to document the island’s efforts to reopen their schools.

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    Ron Brown College Preparatory High School students greet one another before the start of school. --Jared Soares for Education WeekFrom the early stages of recruiting students and training teachers, to the final bell of the school year, Education Week's Kavitha Cardoza and NPR's Cory Turner followed teachers, students, and parents as they documented the first year of Ron Brown College Preparatory High School in the District of Columbia. The school is designed specifically to meet the needs of its young male students students of color – who are called “kings.” And for many of the young men, their needs are profound. Listen to an audio slideshow with excerpts from Part 1.

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    Ron-Brown-Part-2-Bluest-Eye-1024From the early stages of recruiting students and training teachers, to the final bell of the school year, Education Week‘s Kavitha Cardoza and NPR’s Cory Turner followed teachers, students, and parents as they documented the first year of Ron Brown College Preparatory High School in the District of Columbia. The school is designed specifically to meet the needs of […]

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    Ron Brown College Preparatory High School in Northeast Washington, DC.Photographer Jared Soares discusses his experiences, and shares his favorite images from documenting faculty and students at Ron Brown College Preparatory High School in Washington, D.C. The photographs were part of a joint audio reporting project by Education Week and National Public Radio that tracked the first year at the school.

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    Jessie "Little Doe" Baird, right, vice chairwoman of the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe, hugs a member of the audience following the "We Gather Together" celebration at the Old Indian Meeting House, in Mashpee, Mass. --Steven Senne/APThe Massachusetts tribe whose ancestors shared a Thanksgiving meal with the Pilgrims nearly 400 years ago is reclaiming its long-lost language, one schoolchild at a time. Children are being taught exclusively in Wopanaotooaok, a language that had not been spoken for at least a century until the tribe started an effort to reclaim it more than two decades ago.

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    Mirta Rosales, the parent coordinator at P.S. 188 in New York City, greets a student during the last week of the school year. The school provides a range of health and social services to students and families in an effort to blunt the effects of poverty on student achievement and is part of a growing national trend of community schools.
—Mark Abramson for Education Week Read storyEducation Week‘s favorite photographs from 2017, captured by staff and a nationwide network of freelance, wire service and newspaper photojournalists, document news events, policy developments, and people in pre-K-12 education in the United States.

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    Jake Ruhl, (left) Easton Bigham and Zahraa Almohanna eat lunch together at Starkville Early Learning Collaborative on in Starkville, Miss. Mississippi is one of the five lowest-performing states in Education Week's Quality Counts rankings, but one of the places where they rank relatively high is on early childhood education. --Andrea Morales for Education WeekPhotographers on assignment for Education Week visited schools in three states as part of the reporting for the 22nd edition of Quality Counts 2018: Report and Rankings, which focuses on state-by state assessment of public education. The report aims to illuminate what the high-performing states did well, how low-performers are approaching improvement, and lessons for boosting the quality of k-12 education overall. The nation received a grade of C overall with a score of 74.5, about the same as last year, when it posted a 74.2, also a C grade.

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    Angel Magana, is in a Denver teacher-residency program that allows him to work as a paid paraprofessional while working toward his teaching degree. 
--Nathan W. Armes for Education WeekPhotographers on assignment for Education Week visited school districts around the country where different strategies for retaining and recruiting teacher are being utilized.

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    A view of campus as seen from principal Dixie Cooper's office window at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)A stay in a corrections facility­—often hours away from home, school, and everything that is familiar—is a shock to the system for any student. Juvenile facilities like the Wyoming Girls School are exploring ways to reengage students both academically and emotionally, and help them think of themselves as students again.

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    High school student Sebastian Chavez, center,, joins hundred of students walking out of school to rally against against gun violence, Friday, April 20, 2018, in downtown Los Angeles Friday, April 20, 2018. Protests were held across the country Friday, on the 19th anniversary of the Columbine High School shooting.  (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)Students nationwide walked out of their classes on Friday, April 20, for the second mass school walkout since the school shooting in Parkland, Fla. Students marched to demand action on gun violence and school safety on the 19th anniversary of the shooting at Columbine High School in Colorado that claimed the lives of 12 students and one teacher.

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    iLEAD Academy math instructor Jenna Gray works with sophomore Isaac Logsdon on an algebra II problem. —Pat McDonogh/Education WeekiLEAD Academy opened three years ago to help prepare Northern Kentucky students for careers in high-paying, high-demand fields. It uses a wonky weapon – labor-market data – to design course offerings that won’t leave students in dead-end jobs, and to give them solid advice that’s grounded in the needs of regional employers.

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